Anatomy of respiratory system pdf

A complete, schematic view of the human respiratory system with their parts and functions. The anatomy and physiology that make this happen varies anatomy of respiratory system pdf, depending on the size of the organism, the environment in which it lives and its evolutionary history. In land animals the respiratory surface is internalized as linings of the lungs.


Gas exchange in the lungs occurs in millions of small air sacs called alveoli in mammals and reptiles, but atria in birds. These microscopic air sacs have a very rich blood supply, thus bringing the air into close contact with the blood. These air sacs communicate with the external environment via a system of airways, or hollow tubes, of which the largest is the trachea, which branches in the middle of the chest into the two main bronchi. These enter the lungs where they branch into progressively narrower secondary and tertiary bronchi that branch into numerous smaller tubes, the bronchioles.

In birds the bronchioles are termed parabronchi. It is the bronchioles, or parabronchi that generally open into the microscopic alveoli in mammals and atria in birds. Air has to be pumped from the environment into the alveoli or atria by the process of breathing which involves the muscles of respiration. This water flows over the gills by a variety of active or passive means.

Gas exchange takes place in the gills which consist of thin or very flat filaments and lammelae which expose a very large surface area of highly vascularized tissue to the water. Other animals, such as insects, have respiratory systems with very simple anatomical features, and in amphibians even the skin plays a vital role in gas exchange. Plants also have respiratory systems but the directionality of gas exchange can be opposite to that in animals. The respiratory system in plants includes anatomical features such as stomata, that are found in various parts of the plant.

In humans and other mammals, the anatomy of a typical respiratory system is the respiratory tract. The tract is divided into an upper and a lower respiratory tract. The upper tract includes the nose, nasal cavities, sinuses, pharynx and the part of the larynx above the vocal folds.

The intervals between successive branch points along the various branches of “tree” are often referred to as branching “generations”, of which there are, in the adult human about 23. Bronchioles are defined as the small airways lacking and cartilagenous support. The first bronchi to branch from the trachea are the right and left main bronchi.

4th order, 5th order, and 6th order segmental bronchi, or grouped together as subsegmental bronchi. Compared to the, on average, 23 number of branchings of the respiratory tree in the adult human, the mouse has only about 13 such branchings. The alveoli are the dead end terminals of the “tree”, meaning that any air that enters them has to exit via the same route. At the end of inhalation the airways are filled with environmental air, which is exhaled without coming in contact with the gas exchanger.

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