Charging and discharging of inductor pdf

Charging and discharging of inductor pdf inductors whose magnetic properties rather than electrical ones matter, see electromagnet. An inductor, also called a coil, choke or reactor, is a passive two-terminal electrical component that stores electrical energy in a magnetic field when electric current flows through it. An inductor typically consists of an insulated wire wound into a coil around a core.


When the current flowing through an inductor changes, the time-varying magnetic field induces a voltage in the conductor, described by Faraday’s law of induction. As a result, inductors oppose any changes in current through them. An inductor is characterized by its inductance, which is the ratio of the voltage to the rate of change of current. 19th century American scientist Joseph Henry.

Many inductors have a magnetic core made of iron or ferrite inside the coil, which serves to increase the magnetic field and thus the inductance. Along with capacitors and resistors, inductors are one of the three passive linear circuit elements that make up electronic circuits. They are also used in electronic filters to separate signals of different frequencies, and in combination with capacitors to make tuned circuits, used to tune radio and TV receivers. An electric current flowing through a conductor generates a magnetic field surrounding it.

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