Fabulous origami boxes pdf

This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its fabulous origami boxes pdf remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. Modular origami or unit origami is a paperfolding technique which uses two or more sheets of paper to create a larger and more complex structure than would be possible using single-piece origami techniques.


Each individual sheet of paper is folded into a module, or unit, and then modules are assembled into an integrated flat shape or three-dimensional structure by inserting flaps into pockets created by the folding process. These insertions create tension or friction that holds the model together. Modular origami can be classified as a sub-set of multi-piece origami, since the rule of restriction to one sheet of paper is abandoned. However, all the other rules of origami still apply, so the use of glue, thread, or any other fastening that is not a part of the sheet of paper is not generally acceptable in modular origami.

The additional restrictions that distinguish modular origami from other forms of multi-piece origami are using many identical copies of any folded unit, and linking them together in a symmetrical or repeating fashion to complete the model. There is a common misconception that treats all multi-piece origami as modular. More than one type of module can still be used. Typically this means using separate linking units hidden from sight to hold parts of the construction together.

Any other usage is generally discouraged. The first historical evidence for a modular origami design comes from a Japanese book by Hayato Ohoka published in 1734 called Ranma Zushiki. It contains a print that shows a group of traditional origami models, one of which is a modular cube. The six modules required for this design were developed from the traditional Japanese paperfold commonly known as the menko.

Each module forms one face of the finished cube. There are several other traditional Japanese modular designs, including balls of folded paper flowers known as kusudama, or medicine balls.

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