Geography of bangladesh pdf

Meghna Rivers and their tributaries occupy 79 percent of the country. Straddling the Tropic of Cancer, Bangladesh has a geography of bangladesh pdf monsoon climate characterised by heavy seasonal rainfall, high temperatures, and high humidity.


Most of the country is intensively farmed, with rice the main crop, grown in three seasons. Rapid urbanisation is taking place with associated industrial and commercial development. Exports of garments and shrimp plus remittances from Bangladeshis working abroad provide the country’s three main sources of foreign exchange income. Bangladesh’s place in the world.

Located in South Asia, it is virtually surrounded by India and the Bay of Bengal to the south. But in many ways, the country’s fate is dominated by the world’s highest mountain range looming to the north-the Himalayas. The physical geography of Bangladesh is varied and has an area characterised by two distinctive features: a broad deltaic plain subject to frequent flooding, and a small hilly region crossed by swiftly flowing rivers.

The plain is part of the larger Plain of Bengal, which is sometimes called the Lower Gangetic Plain. With such low elevations and numerous rivers, water—and concomitant flooding—is a predominant physical feature. Bangladesh is covered with water, and larger areas are routinely flooded during the monsoon season.

The only exceptions to Bangladesh’s low elevations are the Chittagong Hills in the southeast, the Low Hills of Sylhet in the northeast, and highlands in the north and northwest. The Chittagong Hills constitute the only significant hill system in the country and, in effect, are the western fringe of the north-south mountain ranges of Burma and eastern India.

Bangladesh is found at Mowdok Mual, in the southeastern part of the hills. Fertile valleys lie between the hill lines, which generally run north-south. West of these hills is a narrow, wet coastal plain located between the cities of Chittagong in the north and Cox’s Bazar in the south. Bangladesh’s nonurban land is arable.

The country produces large quantities of quality timber, bamboo, and sugarcane. Bamboo grows in almost all areas, but high-quality timber grows mostly in the highland valleys. Rubber planting in the hilly regions of the country was undertaken in the 1980s, and rubber extraction had started by the end of the decade. A variety of wild animals are found in the forest areas, such as in the Sundarbans on the southwest coast, which is the home of the royal Bengal tiger.

The alluvial soils in the Bangladesh Plain are generally fertile and are enriched with heavy silt deposits carried downstream during the rainy season. The areas around Dhaka and Comilla are the most densely settled.

The Sundarbans, an area of coastal tropical jungle in the southwest and last wild home of the Bengal tiger, and the Chittagong Hill Tracts on the southeastern border with Burma and India, are the least densely populated. Bangladesh map of Köppen climate classification. This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources.

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