King midas and the golden touch myth pdf

Please forward this error screen to 194. XP, 32 king midas and the golden touch myth pdf and 64 bit editions. Simply double-click the downloaded file to install it.

You can choose your language settings from within the program. Midas Touch” and “King Midas” redirect here. It has been suggested that this article be split into articles titled Midas, Midas, 8th century BC and Midas, 6th century BC.

In the Nathaniel Hawthorne version of the Midas myth, Midas’s daughter turns to a golden statue when he touches her. Illustration by Walter Crane for the 1893 edition. The most famous King Midas is popularly remembered in Greek mythology for his ability to turn everything he touched into gold. This came to be called the golden touch, or the Midas touch.

The Phrygian city Midaeum was presumably named after this Midas, and this is probably also the Midas that according to Pausanias founded Ancyra. According to Aristotle, legend held that Midas died of starvation as a result of his “vain prayer” for the gold touch. The legends told about this Midas and his father Gordias, credited with founding the Phrygian capital city Gordium and tying the Gordian Knot, indicate that they were believed to have lived sometime in the 2nd millennium BC, well before the Trojan War.

However, Homer does not mention Midas or Gordias, while instead mentioning two other Phrygian kings, Mygdon and Otreus. Another King Midas ruled Phrygia in the late 8th century BC, up until the sacking of Gordium by the Cimmerians, when he is said to have committed suicide. Most historians believe this Midas is the same person as the Mita, called king of the Mushki in Assyrian texts, who warred with Assyria and its Anatolian provinces during the same period. A third Midas is said by Herodotus to have been a member of the royal house of Phrygia and the grandfather of an Adrastus who fled Phrygia after accidentally killing his brother and took asylum in Lydia during the reign of Croesus.

Phrygia was by that time a Lydian subject. There are many, and often contradictory, legends about the most ancient King Midas. In Thracian Mygdonia, Herodotus referred to a wild rose garden at the foot of Mount Bermion as “the garden of Midas son of Gordias, where roses grow of themselves, each bearing sixty blossoms and of surpassing fragrance”.

Herodotus says elsewhere that Phrygians anciently lived in Europe where they were known as Bryges, and the existence of the garden implies that Herodotus believed that Midas lived prior to a Phrygian migration to Anatolia. According to some accounts, Midas had a son, Lityerses, the demonic reaper of men, but in some variations of the myth he instead had a daughter, Zoë or “life”. According to other accounts he had a son Anchurus.

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